Friend finds Philip Seymour Hoffman dead of an apparent drug overdose

Philip Seymour Hoffman, Oscar winner for his starring role in 'Capote,' dead at 46
Philip Seymour Hoffman, Oscar winner for his starring role in ‘Capote,’ dead at 46

The amazing Philip Seymour Hoffman has died at the age of 46.  Multiple sources report that a friend found him in his Greenwich Village home, with a needle in his arm.  The New York Police Department says that he died of a drug overdose.

Born in 1967 in Fairport, NY, Hoffman went on to earn a BFA at the prestigious New York University Tisch School of the Arts.  He made his motion picture debut in 1992, appearing in three films that were released that year.  Scent of a Woman was the most successful of these, although it wasn’t a “breakthrough” role.  He held his own in scenes in 1994’s Nobody’s Fool with the great Paul Newman and proved he could “take a punch.”

Philip Seymour Hoffman and Bruce Greenwood in 'Capote' the movie that brought Oscar gold to Hoffman
Philip Seymour Hoffman and Bruce Greenwood in ‘Capote’ the movie that brought Oscar gold to Hoffman

In 1996’s Twister and 1997’s Boogie Nights Philip Seymour Hoffman came into prominence with stellar performances in small but important roles.  He would continue to work mostly in independent films, although he did appear in big-budget pictures like Mission Impossible III, The Hunger Games: Catching Fire and Moneyball.

His first Academy Award nomination and only victory came from his portrayal of Truman Capote in 2005’s Capote.  He brought the late author to life and won a slew of awards aside from the coveted gold Oscar.  It is quite illustrative of Hoffman’s ability to get deep inside of the characters he played and give them more than many other actors.  He was capable of doing any role, from the rock journalist “Lester Bangs” in Almost Famous, to the incredibly vile villain “Owen Davien” in MI III, or someone as ordinary and yet complex as “Mitch Roman” in Patch Adams.  His filmography would make a film festival in and of itself.

Philip Seymour Hoffman takes one on the chin from Paul Newman in 'Nobody's Fool'
Philip Seymour Hoffman takes one on the chin from Paul Newman in ‘Nobody’s Fool’

He would go on to receive three more Academy Award nominations, all in the Best Supporting Actor category for The Master, Charlie Wilson’s War and Doubt.  He was also a major talent on stage, and was nominated for three Tony awards, most recently his work as “Willy Loman” in 2012’s “Death of a Salesman.”


Sources are claiming that Philip Seymour Hoffman had completed his work on The Hunger Games:  Mockingjay, Part 1, but had a few days of work left to do on Part 2.  Hoffman never married, but is survived by his long-time partner, Mimi O’Donnell and three children.

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